Trading Post Part 1: Origin

Trading Post Logo

Trading Post Logo… for now.

I have a new game design I’m working on and today I am posting the first of 4 articles about it. Today, and the next three Thursdays, I’ll be writing about the game from it’s creation to the present state. Here’s the four articles I’ll be writing:

  1. TODAY 5-16-13: Origins of Trading Post
  2. 5-23-13: Prototyping Early Versions
  3. 5-30-13: Hiatus and Re-design
  4. 6-6-13: Path to GenCon

So let’s jump back to 2010 when I was first diving into game design and take a look at how Trading Post became a thing…

Concept: Theme

Here you are, explorer extraordinaire! You have been selected from an elite group of explorers to develop a new Trading Post. You role, should you choose to accept it, is to utilize the resources found on your section of their territory, and contribute the most to the Trading Post. Contributions include constructing new buildings for the Trading Post, successfully exploring all of your allotted territory, and completing trades that are beneficial for the Trading Post.

Concept: The Map

Normally when I start a new game design I start with a theme. Trading Post is an unusual case in that it started with both a theme and a map mechanic to be used in that theme. For some reason I thought that a square grid with spots on the corners for putting cubes would be a good idea. And it would seemingly work very well with the Trading Post concept.

Here’s a look at one player’s section of territory in very alpha artwork, if you can refer to lines as artwork:

Octagons represent land/buildings. Diamonds represent resources.

Octagons represent land/buildings. Diamonds represent resources.

The idea of the map is that you can explore the land and add buildings to the octagons. Then each building can produce something that you can place into the diamonds. The resources would be represented by cubes, which would fit very nicely into the diamonds. The really sweet part of this map design is that you have to try and move your goods into the diamonds that adjoin to your territorial neighbors so that you can trade with them without having to use the Trading post as a middle man.

Concept: Game Play

With a theme and map mechanic in place it was time to figure out how the game would actually be played. I had found a really nice article online about what makes a game good. It included things like Tension, Replayability/Variability, No Runaway Winner, No Kingmaker, No Player Elimination and more. If anyone know of the article can you share the link? I can’t ever find it. So after working through some of those things in my head I came up with a ladder type design where you would become more capable of doing more things on your turn.

The idea of this was that you would start as just a person in the Trading Post. You would thus be able to move one spot per action, and you could only explore up to two rows into your territory. Since exploring all of your land is part of the game it would be important to build up the capability. So the first step would be to purchase a horse via trade with the Trading Post.

Once you traded for a horse you would be able to move two spots per action. You would also be able to explore the next row. In the game design the tiles that would be available in this “Horse Region” were better than those available in the “Person Region” (first two rows). This would allow you to do more stuff, make better trades, and work toward the wagon.

The Wagon was the last “upgrade” you could do. To build the wagon you would have to make a series of trades to procure the necessary components: wheels, axles, canopy, box. Once you’ve upgraded to the wagon you can then move three spaces per action and explore the furthermost regions of your territory. This is vital as the most valuable resources are only available in the “Wagon Region.”

Concept: Time and Action Points

During the game each action would cost a certain amount of time. The game would be played over 7 years with each action costing a certain number of months. So moving would cost 1 month. That’s why it would be important to upgrade to a horse or wagon as early as possible to be able to move more spots with the same action. Basically with the game being 7 years of 12 months each player would have 84 action points to work with.

Because I made “time” part of the game I was able to also have the seasons play a role. Each year had a new “Event” card come up that affected something for the year. This could be seasonally dependent as well.

So I came up with a series of event cards to add several things to the game design:

  • Replayability: Each game would be different since the draw of event cards is random.
  • Variability: Specific scenarios of event cards could be established to promote specific game play.
  • More details: Having event cards made the game deeper, in my opinion.

I found early on that having a time mechanic like this made things difficult to design. Since players weren’t always taking the same number of actions on a turn I had to incorporate a “last player gets a turn” mechanic similar to that in Glen More. By doing this I would never have to worry about how player order worked.

The other downside of having 84 actions points (84 months) in the game was that every single turn players would have to advance their “months” token and potentially their “years” token if they entered a new year. Fiddly.

Concept: Overall

I thought I really had something with this game design. I was gung ho about putting together a prototype and making this into the most awesomest game ever. With 8 different resources, 84 action points per player, upgrades to a horse and then wagon, land development, trading, exploration, etc. I knew this would be awesome. Perhaps I was being a little too optimistic.

In my mind I thought this game had a lot of potential. I put a lot of time into it early on only to realize that it was ridiculously complicated. Next week I’ll cover my initial prototyping efforts and the lessons I learned during that phase. In two weeks I’ll share with you the current re-designed version, which is night-and-day better, potentially even being a playable and fun game. And three weeks from now I’ll discuss my path forward with the game as we approach GenCon.

If you have any questions or comments about the game over the next three weeks, just let me know!

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Posted on May 16, 2013, in Game Design, My Games, The Boards, Trading Post, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 8 Comments.

  1. It’s an incredible feeling when you’re at the beginning of a project and A. you know you have something that’s never been done before and B. you have no idea how good it will really be.

  1. Pingback: Trading Post Part 2: Early Prototyping | Boards and Barley

  2. Pingback: Trading Post Part 3: Hiatus and Redesign | Boards and Barley

  3. Pingback: Trading Post: Path to GenCon | Boards and Barley

  4. Pingback: Bonus Trading Post Post | Boards and Barley

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