When you receive Scoville…

Awesomeness coming soon to a table near you!

Awesomeness coming soon to a table near you!

Hello Ladies and Gentlemen. With people posting pictures of their copies of Scoville on Twitter and Facebook I figured I should post something about Scoville. This has been an extremely fun ride from the start of the design process all the way through to this point. I can’t wait to start reading reviews and hearing what people think.

So today I have a few tips regarding the game and the components. I will also link to a different version of the cross-breeding chart for those who are more equation oriented.

Before we get into the tips, if you have received your copy, please go ahead and Tweet it, Facebook it, Instagram it, BGG it, or anything else. Let’s spread the word about Scoville and make it a big hit. (Disclaimer: if you don’t like it, please keep your mouth and social media shut. 🙂 Thanks!)

Horizontal Rule

Components:

OCD vs. non-OCD: The board has pepper punch-outs so that the peppers can be “planted” and all line up perfectly. This is great for people who want things all orderly and such. HOWEVER, if you would prefer to be able to put the peppers on the board in any direction, then just don’t punch out the pepper punch outs.

Would you prefer those peppers to be sloppily arranged?

Would you prefer those peppers to be sloppily arranged?

Pepper Punch-outs: “Pepper Punch-outs” is not the name of an expansion I’m working on (though I suppose it could be!). These are the little cardboard pepper shaped pieces you can punch out of the board. I mention them because they come in really handy if you happen to run out on any specific color of pepper during the game. I recommend saving these little cardboard peppers in the box, just in case you need them.

Sleeve the Cards?: Some people sleeve cards for every single game they own. Others sleeve them for games with high-use cards. The cards in Scoville are what I would call “low-use.” The cards are only handled when obtaining them and scoring them at the end. Otherwise they just sit around. So I personally don’t feel they need to be sleeved. However, if you prefer them sleeved, check out this thread on BGG which can give some guidance about the right size of sleeves. The recipes are 44x67mm and the market cards are 51x51mm.

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Gameplay:

One of the biggest issues I hear from new players is that the cross-breeding chart is too much to grok. So I made a new version that is simpler to read and lists the rules of thumb for cross-breeding. You can download the doc file from Board Game Geek. Or you can save this picture and print it:

An alternate Scoville Cross-Breeding Guide.

An alternate Scoville Cross-Breeding Guide.

That should help you out in case you don’t like the 10×10 grid version.

As I designed the game I struggled mightily about choosing the form of the cross breeding chart. This equation version was easy to read and put things succinctly. But the grid put every breeding combo right in front of you. So I went with the grid. If you prefer this equation version, please let me know.

Beginner Tips

Bonus Plaques and Market Orders: Recipes are mighty appealing, and they should be. But don’t count out the bonus award plaques from the town mayor. Also, don’t neglect the market orders. Many of the afternoon orders are worth 4 points. So if you can get a few of those they really add up.

Bonus Abilities: These are worth 4 points each if unused, but I recommend using them. They can be used to create a huge advantage in the game. One way I like to use them is to gain multiple phantom peppers at a time while preventing all other players from getting any. Plus, the game is meant to be played for fun and I believe it is fun to use those special abilities.

Block other Players: I love how you can block other players from spots on the field. Use this to your advantage. Plant a good combo in a spot only you can reach and then end your turn there even if you’ve only moved one or two spots. This can induce frustration from the other players, which can be fun.

The Yellow and Red player are mired in battle for the peppers in that part of the board.

The Yellow and Red player are mired in battle for the peppers in that part of the board.

Horizontal RuleThanks so much for your interest in Scoville. I believe copies will be moving to retailers and online stores in the very near future. If any of you have issues with your components in your copy, please let me or Tasty Minstrel Games know right away. And if you enjoy the game, feel free to rate it a 10 on BoardGameGeek.com!

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Posted on January 9, 2015, in My Games, Scoville and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Reblogged this on The Board Game Show Podcast and commented:
    I just received my copy of Scoville in the mail today, and perhaps you did, too. What follows is a terrific primer by Ed Marriott, the game’s designer. And if you want to hear about Scoville directly I sat down and talked to Ed about his game in Episode 13. Enjoy!

  2. Hi Ed,

    I’ve recently been enjoying my first forays in to Chilli farming, congratulations on designing such an excellent game!

    After discovering the alternate cross-breeding chart via Google, and realising it was your own design, I emailed Michael Mindes earlier this week to suggest it would make for a nice stretch goal in the upcoming expansion. Michael seemed to like the idea, and said he would forward it on to you. If this is something you want to pursue, I wonder if I might be exceptionally cheeky, and suggest a couple of minor tweaks? I hope you don’t mind – and please feel free to tell me where to get off!

    I think the ‘any primary with another primary’ and ‘any secondary with another secondary’ equations would be a little clearer if the second stacks were shown in a different order to the first. They currently don’t match up to the expanded formulae shown in the brackets. The same is true of the ‘Primary with itself’ and ‘secondary with itself’ equations – the expanded formulae don’t line up with the initial equations. I suppose what I’m saying is that the initial versions of these equations are superfluous given the expanded versions you have included.

    (Yes, I realise I’m a neat freak!)

    Neil

    PS Have you tried any Thornbridge or Kelham Island beers? I can highly recommend both!

    • Thanks for the feedback, Neil. We can definitely make changes like you suggest. This should make it slightly more understandable. I’m glad you’re looking forward to the expansion.

      Sadly I have not had either of those beers.

  1. Pingback: The Cardboard Republic » A Handguide For Planting Peppers: Tips For Scoville

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